Variety of People
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of Hoosiers believe individuals should have the freedom to decide if and when to have children.1 The majority of Indiana believes that includes equal access to abortion. It may not feel like that with all the misinformation out there, but it’s true.

Then you’re ready to speak up for the majority of Hoosiers.

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That’s okay. There’s a lot to think about.

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There’s a lot to this issue you may not know

Why Does It Matter?
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78% of Hoosiers

believe that when someone decides to have an abortion it should be safe. Everyone should be able to get the health care they need—without politicians interfering in medical decisions.

Who Does it Affect?
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3 out of 5 Hoosiers

know someone who’s had an abortion, which isn’t surprising.2 Nearly one in four U.S. women will have an abortion in her lifetime.3

What's at Stake?
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Only 14% of Hoosiers

want to ban abortion entirely. Now that abortion access will be decided by our elected officials, your voice matters more than ever.

Let’s address some common misconceptions and misinformation

Myth

Abortion is physically and mentally harmful to women.

Fact

Abortions, like other reproductive health procedures, are safe.

They have significantly fewer poor outcomes than your average colonoscopy—a similarly routine outpatient procedure. Medication abortions have even safer outcomes while being 94–98% effective before 8 weeks and 94–96% after 8 weeks.4 And getting an abortion does not increase a pregnant person’s risk of depression, anxiety, or post-traumatic stress disorder.5 It also doesn’t increase the risk of breast cancer.6

But the mental and physical safety of abortion alone isn’t all this is about. We have to consider the safety of the alternative: requiring pregnant people to continue a pregnancy against their will. Being denied an abortion leads to a higher risk of serious complications during their pregnancy, it increases the likelihood of anxiety and staying tethered to abusive partners.7

On top of that, the maternal mortality rate for Indiana is the third worst in the nation,8 and as in so many areas related to healthcare, Black and Brown people are particularly vulnerable to disparities in reproductive care. For every 100,000 births in Indiana, 42 white women and 53 Black women will die as a result. In the 33 Indiana counties that don’t have any hospitals with obstetrics care, that number increases to 76 deaths overall for every 100,000 births.9 Getting an abortion is a lot safer than giving birth in Indiana.

Hear Dr. Caitlin
Bernard's Take
Myth

Too many women use abortion as birth control. 

Fact

The choice to have an abortion is a deeply personal medical decision, one that often happens after talking to trusted family members and physicians.

There are lots of reasons a person might get an abortion, and we can’t judge another Hoosier’s decision when we haven’t walked in their shoes.

Using any family planning techniques, including contraception of all kinds and abortion care are all deeply personal medical decisions based on what’s right for that person, their family, and their life. Hoosiers should have the freedom to make these decisions without interference from the state.

Hear Dr. Tracey
Wilkinson's Take
Hear Dr. Caitlin
Bernard's Take
Myth

If abortion is outlawed, women will no longer receive abortions.

Fact

We know this isn’t true because it’s never been true. When governments make it harder to access abortion care, it disproportionately hurts people whose lives are already hard.

Women who can’t afford the added expense that hard-to-access care requires,  such as extra time off work or extra childcare, may not be able to receive timely care, may be forced to continue an unsafe or unwanted pregnancy, or may try to get an abortion in some unsafe way.

Outlawing abortion also means that women—especially rural, low-income, non-English speakers, or poorly educated people—will be at risk of being prosecuted for miscarriages or attempted abortions. A woman seeking medical care should not be treated as a criminal. It’s not an idle threat, it’s already happened.10

Hear Rabbi Brett
Krichiver's Take
Myth

Pro-choice advocates want abortion to be legal up to the moment the baby is delivered.

Fact

Abortions later in pregnancy are incredibly rare—less than 1% of all abortions,11 and happen when something has gone terribly wrong.

When the worst has happened in a pregnancy, the decision about what to do next should be between a woman, her family, and her physician—not dictated by politicians looking to spark outrage. The majority of Hoosiers trust medical experts, not politicians, to keep reproductive health care safe. Every pregnancy and every woman’s circumstances are different, and one-size-fits-all laws don’t work for every unique situation.

You should also know that previous to the Dobbs decision, the Supreme Court had set the standard that Americans have a right to abortion up to the point of viability, when a fetus can survive outside of the womb, which happens at about 24 weeks. In Indiana, abortions can be performed until 20 weeks postfertilization.12

Hear Dr. Caitlin
Bernard's Take
Myth

There are currently no restrictions on abortion.

Fact

Hoosiers agree that when someone decides to have an abortion, it should be safe.

The vast majority also agree that abortion care should be regulated by medical experts, not by politicians with political agendas.

But that’s not currently the case. Medical decisions are being hindered or even undermined by politics. As a result of years of targeted laws, doctors are now forced to read scripts written by politicians, carry out medically unnecessary ultrasounds, and follow regulations that don’t fit the recommendations of the Federal Drug Administration and other nationally recognized medical experts.13 Everyone should be able to get the health care they need, and certain politicians’ agendas shouldn’t dictate personal medical decisions.

Hear Dr. Caitlin
Bernard's Take
Hear Dr. Tracey
Wilkinson's Take
Myth

Women already have equal access to abortion.

Fact

In the past decade, the Indiana legislature has enacted 55 abortion restrictions and bans.14

Politicians, not medical experts, design these regulations to be burdensome. And these burdens disproportionately affect Hoosiers who are low-income, non-native speakers, low education, or live in rural areas.

Abortion can’t be covered by normal insurance, making it an out-of-pocket cost. Laws about how wide the halls should be make it hard for clinics to keep their doors open, so there are fewer of them, farther away. Indiana, like many states, has a laundry list of these requirements on the books, targeting only abortion providers. They’re common enough that there’s a term for them: TRAP (Targeted Restrictions of Abortion Providers) laws.15 These laws make it hard for providers to offer abortions, even though the procedure is safer than many outpatient surgical procedures.

Indiana requires an 18-hour waiting period between state-mandated “counseling”16 and getting the procedure, forcing people to make two separate trips—double the time off work, double the childcare, double the transportation.

Not only is access to abortion unequal, the likelihood of needing one in the first place is similarly disproportionate. The more adversity you face in your life—like being low-income or a person of color—the more likely you are to experience an unintended pregnancy that may lead you to seek an abortion.17

Hear Dr. Caitlin
Bernard's Take
Myth

Abortion is murder.

Fact

Abortion is a matter of health care, not a criminal act.

Everyone should have the freedom to decide if and when to have children, and what’s best for them and their families. 

Being in charge of what happens to your own body is an essential part of our American, democratic society. All people, including pregnant people, should be able to get the health care they need without interference by state politicians.

Hear Rev. Patrick
Burke's Take
Hear Rabbi Brett
Krichiver's Take
Myth

Abortion is never necessary to save a woman’s life.

Fact

There are absolutely times when an abortion is medically necessary to save a pregnant person’s life.

If a pregnant person’s water breaks before 20 weeks the fetus won’t survive, and that person’s risk for a deadly infection increases significantly. If they get diagnosed with cancer and are pregnant, chemotherapy, a life-saving procedure, can’t be done unless they have an abortion. Placental abruption, where the placenta starts to separate from the uterus can be life-threatening, as can preeclampsia in early pregnancy. These are all worst-case scenarios, and while rare, in countries around the world where abortion is illegal they mean the death of the pregnant person.18

Hear Rabbi Brett
Krichiver's Take
Hear Dr. Caitlin
Bernard's Take
Myth

You can’t be “pro-choice” without being “pro-abortion?”

Fact

You can be a champion for your neighbors’ freedom to decide their own path without having had an abortion yourself.

You can support your fellow Hoosiers by advocating for policies that help lower the incidence of unintended pregnancies to begin with. You can demand that politicians stop twisting this issue to fit their own agendas. You can demand better healthcare options for women across the state. And you can do all that while not believing abortion is the right option for you, and your family, and where you are right now. That’s what the freedom to decide for yourself is all about.

Hear Dr. Tracey
Wilkinson's Take
Hear Rabbi Brett
Krichiver's Take
Myth

This isn’t relevant to me—I haven’t had an abortion and don’t know anyone else who has had one.

Fact

Whether you know their story or not, it’s pretty likely you do know someone who’s had an abortion—three in five Hoosiers do.

And across the United States, one in four women will have an abortion in her lifetime.19 They are people who were able to decide their own path in life, if and when to have children at the right time, with the right person. They’re our neighbors, cousins, coworkers and friends, even our mothers and grandmothers. Abortion care, family planning, and the access to all reproductive health shapes our families in ways we can’t always see on the surface.

Hear Rima
Shahid's Take
Hear Rabbi Brett
Krichiver's Take
01 /10

Hear what abortion is like in Indiana

“I got really, really sick when I was pregnant. I felt like I was dying. If it’s hurting you, then you shouldn’t be forced to go through with a whole pregnancy.”

“I was on birth control. I still became pregnant. I instinctively knew it was the best decision. I’ve never again questioned my choice, and I don’t allow anyone else to either.”

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Jessica B.

“I was a 21-year-old in college when my birth control failed. Every woman should have a choice in when and how she starts her family.”

“I was pregnant with my second child when the doctor told us we needed additional tests. I was in shock. This wasn’t something I thought would happen to me.”

Read More
Nicole

“My first thought was “no, that can’t be because I am on the pill.” I was barely hanging on mentally and spiritually. I knew my only option was abortion.”

Read More
Sarah L.

“My boyfriend and I attended a prestigious, religiously-affiliated university. We didn’t have regular access to any birth control except the “rhythm method.” Abortion saved our lives.”

Read More
Mary K.

“It was 1983, I was 28 years old and totally irresponsible. I thought we were serious—I knew I was. He had no intention of having a long term relationship with me.”

“At 20 weeks we found out our son had an extreme birth defect with no chance of living. This wasn’t a choice. It was a necessary medical procedure.”

When I found out I was pregnant in December, I was so scared. I have a neurological condition that causes fainting and seizures. The pregnancy made me even sicker, and I started having episodes constantly. I felt like I was dying. I started searching immediately for an abortion in Indiana, but they all cost $1200. Who has $1200 lying around? So I asked my friend to take me to Chicago, where I found some abortions for Indiana medicaid clients for about $300.

I found a quiet, generic clinic. They warned me about protesters. I went inside and eventually sat down with a woman who told me what would happen. She said that she was going to give me some pills and that I could take the rest at home, but I had to take the first one in the clinic. She explained everything that was in them, and everything that I would go through. What I didn’t realize is that it’s not just a really bad period. It was like straight-up labor. I was in agony for 3 days because it took so long to find an abortion that by the time I was able to get it, I was 10.5 weeks. It was harder than it had to be—it shouldn’t have been that hard. I was weak for about 3 weeks after, but I’m stronger than ever now. It was painful and I desperately wanted and needed it.

Abortion needs to be a right because I got really, really sick when I was pregnant and I felt like I was dying. If it’s hurting you, then you shouldn’t be forced to go through with a whole pregnancy. It takes too long to just get it over with.

Hazy

I was 22. He was 35. Or at least, that’s what he told me.

I had just moved to Texas for graduate school. I didn’t know anyone there. He lived in my new apartment building.

We had been dating for 3 months. I was on birth control. I still became pregnant. He wanted me to keep the pregnancy, but I wasn’t willing to compromise my future. I got an abortion. At the time, I instinctively knew it was the best decision.

Months later, I found out that this man had been lying about his name, his age, (he was actually 40 years old) and his birthdate.

I have never again questioned my choice, and I don’t allow anyone else to either.

Abortion is healthcare. It is a woman’s right to protect her mind, body, and spirit from those who seek to control it and use it to their own gain.

Jessica B.

I was a 21-year-old in college when my birth control failed. I was on the pill and took a supplement that I was unaware would affect my birth control. I was finishing up my junior year and would be starting student teaching in August. When I saw the positive pregnancy test I was confused and scared. I had dreamed of becoming a teacher my entire life. I knew that having a baby would mean I would need to drop out of the teaching program. Student teaching is full time and unpaid. I was not in a steady relationship and both my parents worked full time. I would not be able to afford childcare while I finished school. I chose to terminate the pregnancy at 7 weeks. To this day it is the hardest decision I have ever had to make. I went on to graduate college with a double major in Elementary Education and Psychology. I have been teaching for 6 years and have been able to make a difference for hundreds of children. I recently became a foster parent so that I could foster one of my students in a family crisis. I now have a beautiful daughter with a man who loves and supports me. None of this would have happened if I had been forced to have a child in college. Every woman should have a choice in when and how she starts her family.

I know this has nothing to do with babies. This is all about control and we will not allow you to control us. No one should be forced to carry a child.

Anna

I was pregnant with my second child when the doctor told us we needed additional tests. After several ultrasounds and DNA testing it was determined that she wouldn’t survive outside the womb and would probably die inside me. I was in shock. This wasn’t something I thought would happen to me. I was at a hospital that wasn’t allowed to tell me all my options. Thankfully there was a nurse who explained everything in a scientific way, not a “pray for a miracle” way.

We decided to think about things and talk to family. I thought I could “be strong” and carry the fetus until it died. After one week, I realized I didn’t want to have all the questions about being pregnant and people being excited. I started obsessing about her dying inside me. The pregnancy was already weighing on my mind and impacting my ability to parent my daughter.

It was an awful experience, the hardest thing I’ve been through. As it turns out, I was/am strong. I had an abortion. I ended the pain and ended the pregnancy. I am so grateful for the medical professionals and that I got to decide when I was ready. I was a 30-year-old mom, married, with a higher ed degree, a professional career and I was capable of deciding to end my pregnancy on my terms. I am still capable and I have no regrets.

It’s healthcare. People have the right to decide when they want to be a parent. Raising kids is hard. It’s not something a person should be forced to do.

Nicole

In 2009, I was a single mother to my 3-year-old daughter. We lived in a small one-bedroom apartment. I worked 40 hours a week but could barely make ends meet. I did not receive any child support from her father. I was on government assistance, receiving food stamps and childcare vouchers. I want to stress that I was also taking the pill. I was not in any romantic relationship and did not want to become pregnant.

It was close to Valentine’s day and I didn’t want to spend it alone. I went on a date and ultimately had a one night stand with him. A few weeks later I became severely nauseous and nothing seemed to help it. Then fear came over me because a co-worker mentioned I could be pregnant. My first thought was “no, that can’t be because I am on the pill.” But then I thought, ‘Well, I was on birth control when I got pregnant with my daughter.’ So I took a pregnancy test, and sure enough I was pregnant! Without any hesitation I knew I could not bring a child into this world to take care of. I was barely hanging on mentally and spiritually. Financially, I was living paycheck to paycheck and knew I couldn’t afford another mouth to feed. I had no family to help or support me. I thought about giving the baby up for adoption but after speaking with an attorney and he explained the process I broke down in his office because I knew I could not go through with the adoption process. I knew my only option was abortion. I chose to have abortion.

I called the clinic and scheduled my appointment. It would take 2 appointments for the abortion. First was on a Wednesday when the office had to confirm the pregnancy and show me the ultrasound. Luckily for me I was only 6 weeks along and the ultrasound tech could not find a heartbeat. I then had to wait two days and had the abortion on a Friday.

That was 13 years ago. I think about the abortion often, but I have no regrets. It was my choice! Today, I am 39 years old, a stay-at-home mom, with three amazing kids and a loving husband.

All medical (i.e. ectopic) or ethical (i.e. rape) reason aside, it is a human right for a woman to chose what she wants to do. Ultimately, it is the mother that has to carry the fetus/baby, deliver, and then take care of the child. If the mother knows she is not mentally, physically, financially stable to have a child then she should know that she has options.

Sarah L.

My boyfriend and I attended a prestigious, religiously-affiliated university. Neither the student health center nor any on-campus stores prescribed or sold any forms of birth control. Freshmen weren’t allowed to keep cars on campus. Consequently, it was a long bus ride just to get to a drug store for OTC devices like condoms. We didn’t have regular access to any birth control except the “rhythm method.” After I finally was able to keep a car, I went to Planned Parenthood. I was tested (negative) and examined (negative), and told to start the pill 5 days after my next period started. That period never came. I was already pregnant when I was tested, but in those days the tests were not accurate early on.

My then-boyfriend of two years came from a poor family. Mine was barely middle class. Having a baby was impossible. Our parents would have been incredibly ashamed, and there is no way we would have been able to keep up with school with a baby. I could not give up a child I carried for nine months, either. So, I had an abortion at 9 weeks. My boyfriend paid for half of it, but we lived in different parts of the country, so I went to the appointment alone.

We had no regrets about the abortion, because it saved our lives. Both of us went on to have professional careers that paid well, though we did not stay together more than 3 more years after the abortion. We weren’t stuck together.

I remarried and had a wonderful daughter exactly when we wanted to—after I finished my professional education. My first husband never had kids, which was a blessing and further proof that our abortion was the right call. He never wanted to be a father. I did want to be a mother, but when I was ready. It should always be the woman’s choice!

This country was built largely by people who had different religious beliefs than their home countries, who persecuted them. That’s why the First Amendment exists.

Mary K.

It was 1983, I was 28 years old and totally irresponsible. Recently divorced, I began seeing an old friend and we became sexually active. I thought we were serious—I knew I was. I got pregnant. He insisted I get an abortion. He had no intention of having a long term relationship with me. I was devastated. I attempted to meet with my pastor—he was on vacation. My OB/GYN was Roman Catholic—he refused to make a referral for an abortion. I went to the local abortion clinic—I was past the 12-week cut off period. I called my OB/GYN office and spoke with a wonderful RN who referred me to a local OB who did abortions in his office. I made an appointment. The sperm donor went with me and paid for it. He drove me home and left. I have never seen him again. I am grateful that I had the option and resources for an abortion. While I regret it, it was the best decision I could make at that time.

It is a very personal decision that should not be interfered with by the government.

Lynn

My husband and I are lifelong Hoosiers. I grew up in Bargersville and attended Hanover College—the 35th in my family to do so. I am an attorney, receiving my law degree from IU McKinney Law School. My husband grew up in Anderson and attended Rose Hulman to become an electrical engineer.

We had been trying to conceive for 4 years and finally got pregnant in the fall of 2020. At 9 weeks, the ultrasound looked great. Four weeks later, we found out we were going to have a little boy. We felt so blessed.

At week 20 in the pregnancy, we received our second ultrasound—the anatomy ultrasound which is more in depth. It was then we  got the earth-shattering news that our baby boy had an extreme birth defect, one of the worst cases of encephalocele they had ever seen. Over 75% of his brain was growing outside of his skull. The chances for encephalocele occurring are 1 in 10,000. Given how extreme his case was, he had a 100% chance of dying.

We got multiple opinions, all of them the same diagnosis and likely outcome. We had two options: lose our little boy now with a D&E procedure, or later with either a stillbirth or the infinitesimally small possibility that he might be born alive and immediately die in our arms.

This wasn’t a choice. There was no viable path to a healthy baby or birth. The emotional and mental trauma was already hitting us so hard. Words can’t express the pain and agony of carrying our son that week between finding out he was going to die and the day of the procedure.  To know he may be in pain. To know our miracle was lost.

I have flashbacks to the week when I carried him but knew he would not live. I felt him move and felt the movement lessen. I heard the sincere congratulations from strangers and loved ones, just to break down in tears and tell them that he was going to die and was dying inside of me right then. Between the news that shattered my world and this one-week wait, it nearly killed me. All I wanted was to save him and I was hopeless.

We lost him on December 30th. The doctor was so loving. She had children of her own. She knew the pain I was going through. She gave me her personal cell phone number and frequently called me, even on Christmas Eve, to check in on me, to listen to me cry, to answer any questions. At the hospital, the nurses embraced me as I sobbed. They gave me a beautiful urn that was about the size of a strawberry. It was ceramic and hand painted with trees and deer in green, yellow, and white. We keep it on our mantle.

I spent months in bed. I contemplated suicide. I talked to a grief counselor twice a week. I shut out my family and friends, neglected work, and woke up almost every night hyperventilating in fits of tears.

I wouldn’t be alive if I had to carry my dying or dead son to term. What I went through nearly broke me. The flashbacks to that week between knowing he was dying to the day we lost him still haunt me. Going through 4.5-5 more months of that purgatory would have killed me, killed my family, killed my marriage. No one is that strong.

Life will never be the same. I never appreciated grief until losing my son. I regret the times that I perfunctorily passed along condolences when family and friends had loved ones who had passed because I never really understood what that person was going through. Now I do. This type of grief lives inside of you. It never lessens. It just hits less frequently as time marches on.

It took us another two years to conceive again. We just had a successful 20-week anatomy ultrasound and are due in late October 2022. We cried and cried upon hearing that our new baby is healthy. Our son will never be replaced, but we are hopeful with our new miracle. We will tell her about her brother, walk her among the trees that we planted for him, and will love her with every ounce of our being, just like we loved and continue to love the little boy we lost.

I can’t tell you how many women I have met who have similar stories—women whose babies had lethal defects, women who begged their doctors to find a viable path but it was impossible, women whose babies would die inside of them. We cherish the miracle of life. We cherish pregnancies and babies. We want to build our families. But a greater power existed and rare defects took our babies late in our pregnancies. Without abortions, our lives and our future children’s lives would not have continued. Because of abortion, we were able to continue living, try to heal, and perhaps be lucky enough to conceive again. We do not take abortion lightly. In fact, it shattered our worlds. But it was a necessary medical procedure to save our lives when our babies could not live. We are grateful for the doctors and nurses who saved our lives and were merciful with our babies who could not live.

Jen

Know your rights

Abortion is legal in Indiana today, but what’s legal could change quickly. Only your healthcare provider can tell you, based on your circumstances, when and how you can access an abortion. S.E.A. 1, a law that bans abortion in Indiana, with narrow exceptions, has been temporarily blocked in court.

Here are some examples of what abortion restrictions look like in Indiana right now:

  • Abortions can be legally obtained before 20 weeks post fertilization.
  • The parent of a minor must consent before an abortion is provided, or the minor must petition a judge for an exception.
  • Insurance will cover abortion only in limited cases, in cases of dire health consequences, rape, or incest, for example. Additional abortion coverage riders are available through private insurers.
  • A patient must receive state-directed “counseling,” through their healthcare provider, which includes information designed by politicians to discourage having an abortion, and then wait 18 hours before the procedure is provided. Counseling must be provided in person, by their care provider, and must take place before the waiting period begins, requiring two trips to the facility to get an abortion.
Indiana State Capitol Image

Speak up and take action

Here’s what you can do to make a difference for every Hoosier.
01
See How Your Legislator Voted

Politicians should represent the interests of the people they serve. See where your legislator stands on reproductive freedom with our legislative scorecard. Find out how they voted on SB1, make sure they know your position.

See the Scorecard
02
Talk to your people

Sincere conversations with people we trust and love are the best way to change opinions. We’ve got a conversation guide to help. 

Download
03
Spread the word

Share what you’ve learned, what you believe! It doesn’t feel like these are majority opinions because we don’t hear them as often. Become a squeaky wheel.

Social Shareable

It may not feel like it’s the majority opinion, because this issue gets used to score political points. But most Hoosiers believe equal access to abortion is important. Despite the almost total ban on abortion passed in Indiana in July, we’re still making our voices heard. #LetsTalkAboutAbortionIN

Social Shareable

Most Hoosiers believe we should all have the freedom to decide if and when to have children. That means access to the full range of reproductive health care—without politicians interfering. Are you with us? The time is now. #LetsTalkAboutAbortionIN

Social Shareable

We can’t know all the reasons someone might decide an abortion is right for them unless we’ve walked in their shoes. But when they do, it should be safe and legal. We should decide what’s right for ourselves and our family—not politicians. #LetsTalkAboutAbortionIN

Download the full social toolkit here.

Download

Check our Work

There’s a lot of misleading information out there about abortion. Some of it uses citations, but cherry pick, misconstrue, or twist the meaning. We aren’t doing that here. Below are the facts we relied on for this guide, where we got them, and links to see them for yourself. Check it out.

  1. Lake Research Partners: findings from a statewide phone survey of Indiana voters in 2020, commissioned by the ACLU of Indiana. These results reflected similar polling done in Indiana and at a national level. Midwest Gallup—51% of people in the Midwest agree abortion should be legal in all or most cases. National Gallup—80% of people across the country agree abortion should be legal in all or some circumstances.
  2. Lake Research Partners: findings from a statewide phone survey of Indiana voters in 2020, commissioned by the ACLU of Indiana. These results reflected similar polling done in Indiana and at a national level. Ball State University Hoosier Survey—only 17% of Hoosiers think abortion should be banned.
  3. Guttmacher Institute: Abortion is a safe and common medical procedure. By age 20, 4.6% of women will have had an abortion, and 19% will have done so by age 30.
  4. Kaiser Family Foundation: “Medication abortion is a safe and highly effective method of pregnancy termination if the pills are administered at 9 weeks’ ge­­station or less, the pregnancy is terminated successfully 99.6% of the time, with a 0.4% risk of major complications, and an associated mortality rate of less than 0.001 percent (0.00064%).”
  5. American Psychological Association: A review of the scientific literature conducted by an APA task force and released in 2008 indicated that the relative risk of mental health problems following a single elective first-trimester abortion of is no greater risk to mental health than carrying that pregnancy to term.
  6. American Cancer Society: Scientific research studies show that medication abortions and medical abortions are not linked to increased risk of breast cancer.
  7. Advancing New Standards in Reproductive Health: Women who were denied an abortion and gave birth reported more life-threatening complications like eclampsia and postpartum hemorrhage compared to those who received wanted abortions. In this study, the higher risks of childbirth were tragically demonstrated by two women who were denied an abortion and died following delivery, while no women died from an abortion.
  8.  America’s Health Rankings: Indiana ranks 35th out of 50 states in the health of women and children in the state—especially because of our high maternal mortality, household smoking, and high neonatal mortality rate
  9.  “Joy in Jeopardy”: The Indianapolis Star investigated why it’s so dangerous for women to give birth in Indiana and found a number of alarming risk factors for Hoosiers—including obstetric deserts that affect more than 650,000 people in 33 counties without any obstetric care at all. Women in these counties have significant obstacles to overcome to receive the care needed for safe pregnancies and deliveries, like consistent prenatal care and proximity to emergency care. These challenges are worse for women of color.
  10. The Indianapolis Star: Purvi Patel was convicted of feticide in 2015, receiving a 20-year sentence. Her case was vacated in 2016. The Indiana Court of Appeals decision that overturned her conviction suggested that the law wasn’t meant to be applied against the women whose fetuses were involved, but the statute, nonetheless, opens the door for the state to prosecute women for doing anything that might harm a fetus—even smoking or drinking.
  11. Guttmacher Institute: Indiana law prohibits abortion after 20 weeks postfertilization/22 weeks after the last menstrual period only in cases of threats to the  life or severely compromised physical health of the pregnant person. This law is based on the assertion, which is inconsistent with scientific evidence and has been rejected by the medical community, that a fetus can feel pain at that point in pregnancy.
  12. Center for Disease Control and Prevention: In 2019, less than 1% of abortions happened after 21 weeks, and only 6.2% happened between 13 and 20 weeks, and 92.7% happened before 13 weeks.
  13. Kaiser Family Foundation: During the COVID-19 pandemic, the FDA suspended its requirement for in-person dispensing of the pills for medication abortions—enabling women to receive the pills in the mail and avoid spreading COVID. Because the FDA considers mailing these medications to be safe, it is considering lifting these requirements permanently. However, state lawmakers continue to put restrictions on this very common form of abortion, counter to the science.
  14. Guttmacher Institute: Guttmacher tracks the restrictions passed in legislation across the country.
  15. Guttmacher Institute: TRAP laws are all designed by politicians to be burdensome, forcing abortion providers to close their doors because it becomes too expensive or challenging to provide this service. These laws use the language of safety and concern for better outcomes, but medical experts already ensure high safety standards for medical facilities and providers without these overly restrictive standards.
  16. Indiana Informed Consent: 18 hours before an abortion procedure, abortion providers are required to provide a brochure and counseling to anyone who wants an abortion. This brochure contains misleading information For example, it uses references to link abortion to infertility risks, but the reference says outright that “Generally, elective abortion isn’t thought to cause fertility issues or complications in future pregnancies.” At the very end of the brochure it states “This brochure was created to provide general information about abortion and should not be considered legal, medical, or other professional advice,” because it was written to meet the needs of politicians, not the people seeking health care.
  17. American Psychological Association: Research indicates that women living in poverty, low-income women, and women of color are more likely than others to experience cumulative adversity and are at increased risk for unintended pregnancy.
  18. Human Rights Watch: In countries across Latin America, we see women, even children, dying because they can’t access abortion care.
  19. Guttmacher Institute: Abortion is a safe and common medical procedure. By age 20, 4.6% of women will have had an abortion, and 19% will have done so by age 30.
See our sources
  1. Lake Research Partners: findings from a statewide phone survey of Indiana voters in 2020, commissioned by the ACLU of Indiana. These results reflected similar polling done in Indiana and at a national level. Midwest Gallup—51% of people in the Midwest agree abortion should be legal in all or most cases. National Gallup—80% of people across the country agree abortion should be legal in all or some circumstances.
  2. Lake Research Partners: findings from a statewide phone survey of Indiana voters in 2020, commissioned by the ACLU of Indiana. These results reflected similar polling done in Indiana and at a national level. Ball State University Hoosier Survey—only 17% of Hoosiers think abortion should be banned.
  3. Guttmacher Institute: Abortion is a safe and common medical procedure. By age 20, 4.6% of women will have had an abortion, and 19% will have done so by age 30.
  4. Kaiser Family Foundation: “Medication abortion is a safe and highly effective method of pregnancy termination if the pills are administered at 9 weeks’ ge­­station or less, the pregnancy is terminated successfully 99.6% of the time, with a 0.4% risk of major complications, and an associated mortality rate of less than 0.001 percent (0.00064%).”
  5. American Psychological Association: A review of the scientific literature conducted by an APA task force and released in 2008 indicated that the relative risk of mental health problems following a single elective first-trimester abortion of is no greater risk to mental health than carrying that pregnancy to term.
  6. American Cancer Society: Scientific research studies show that medication abortions and medical abortions are not linked to increased risk of breast cancer.
  7. Advancing New Standards in Reproductive Health: Women who were denied an abortion and gave birth reported more life-threatening complications like eclampsia and postpartum hemorrhage compared to those who received wanted abortions. In this study, the higher risks of childbirth were tragically demonstrated by two women who were denied an abortion and died following delivery, while no women died from an abortion.
  8.  America’s Health Rankings: Indiana ranks 35th out of 50 states in the health of women and children in the state—especially because of our high maternal mortality, household smoking, and high neonatal mortality rate
  9.  “Joy in Jeopardy”: The Indianapolis Star investigated why it’s so dangerous for women to give birth in Indiana and found a number of alarming risk factors for Hoosiers—including obstetric deserts that affect more than 650,000 people in 33 counties without any obstetric care at all. Women in these counties have significant obstacles to overcome to receive the care needed for safe pregnancies and deliveries, like consistent prenatal care and proximity to emergency care. These challenges are worse for women of color.
  10. The Indianapolis Star: Purvi Patel was convicted of feticide in 2015, receiving a 20-year sentence. Her case was vacated in 2016. The Indiana Court of Appeals decision that overturned her conviction suggested that the law wasn’t meant to be applied against the women whose fetuses were involved, but the statute, nonetheless, opens the door for the state to prosecute women for doing anything that might harm a fetus—even smoking or drinking.
  11. Guttmacher Institute: Indiana law prohibits abortion after 20 weeks postfertilization/22 weeks after the last menstrual period only in cases of threats to the  life or severely compromised physical health of the pregnant person. This law is based on the assertion, which is inconsistent with scientific evidence and has been rejected by the medical community, that a fetus can feel pain at that point in pregnancy.
  12. Center for Disease Control and Prevention: In 2019, less than 1% of abortions happened after 21 weeks, and only 6.2% happened between 13 and 20 weeks, and 92.7% happened before 13 weeks.
  13. Kaiser Family Foundation: During the COVID-19 pandemic, the FDA suspended its requirement for in-person dispensing of the pills for medication abortions—enabling women to receive the pills in the mail and avoid spreading COVID. Because the FDA considers mailing these medications to be safe, it is considering lifting these requirements permanently. However, state lawmakers continue to put restrictions on this very common form of abortion, counter to the science.
  14. Guttmacher Institute: Guttmacher tracks the restrictions passed in legislation across the country.
  15. Guttmacher Institute: TRAP laws are all designed by politicians to be burdensome, forcing abortion providers to close their doors because it becomes too expensive or challenging to provide this service. These laws use the language of safety and concern for better outcomes, but medical experts already ensure high safety standards for medical facilities and providers without these overly restrictive standards.
  16. Indiana Informed Consent: 18 hours before an abortion procedure, abortion providers are required to provide a brochure and counseling to anyone who wants an abortion. This brochure contains misleading information For example, it uses references to link abortion to infertility risks, but the reference says outright that “Generally, elective abortion isn’t thought to cause fertility issues or complications in future pregnancies.” At the very end of the brochure it states “This brochure was created to provide general information about abortion and should not be considered legal, medical, or other professional advice,” because it was written to meet the needs of politicians, not the people seeking health care.
  17. American Psychological Association: Research indicates that women living in poverty, low-income women, and women of color are more likely than others to experience cumulative adversity and are at increased risk for unintended pregnancy.
  18. Human Rights Watch: In countries across Latin America, we see women, even children, dying because they can’t access abortion care.
  19. Guttmacher Institute: Abortion is a safe and common medical procedure. By age 20, 4.6% of women will have had an abortion, and 19% will have done so by age 30.